quality index

Grazing marsh ditches: salinity index

Brackish grazing marsh systems are naturally poorer in species than freshwater systems, so this difference needs to be taken into account during site evaluation. As many grazing marshes are situated near the coast, their ditches often support invertebrates tolerant of salinity. Salt-tolerant invertebrate species that can be used as indicators of brackish conditions are given a score in this index, based on a scale of 0 (least tolerant of saline conditions) to 2 (dependent on at least mildly saline conditions).

IEC (Original)

The Index of Ecological Continuity (IEC) for beetles was originally developed as a means of producing a simple statistic which could be used in grading a site for its significance to the conservation of saproxylic (wood-decay) beetles based on ecological considerations rather than rarity. Several important sites have been designated as a result of this approach to interpreting site species lists as saproxylic assemblages of ecological significance.

Western peat bog indicators - spiders

This lists 71 spiders showing a high measure of naturalness from western peat bog systems, under conditions where good peatland naturalness occurs when the naturalness measure >0.5, the Spider SQI >1.8, and with sampling rules applied. The database returns a count of those matching species from the list in the sample. It is unclear how eastern bogs fare under this measure, and there is currently little overall context for it, so it should be used cautiously.

Pantheon returns a score that is simply the total number of species in a sample that are listed as indicator species.

Seepage fidelity score - woodland

Seepages are very small, flowing waterbodies. They are characterised by generally slow rates of flow, and by being extremely shallow, sometimes no more than a film of water over the substrate. This means that they are most often associated with the uppermost sections of waterbodies, being transitional to streams and rivers as they gather water lower in the catchment. They are also very often derived from springs.

Seepage fidelity score - stable cliff

Seepages are very small, flowing waterbodies. They are characterised by generally slow rates of flow, and by being extremely shallow, sometimes no more than a film of water over the substrate. This means that they are most often associated with the uppermost sections of waterbodies, being transitional to streams and rivers as they gather water lower in the catchment. They are also very often derived from springs.

Seepage fidelity score - slumping cliff

Seepages are very small, flowing waterbodies. They are characterised by generally slow rates of flow, and by being extremely shallow, sometimes no more than a film of water over the substrate. This means that they are most often associated with the uppermost sections of waterbodies, being transitional to streams and rivers as they gather water lower in the catchment. They are also very often derived from springs.

Seepage fidelity score - calcareous

Seepages are very small, flowing waterbodies. They are characterised by generally slow rates of flow, and by being extremely shallow, sometimes no more than a film of water over the substrate. This means that they are most often associated with the uppermost sections of waterbodies, being transitional to streams and rivers as they gather water lower in the catchment. They are also very often derived from springs.

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